Monthly Archives: July 2013

Review: Deadline in Athens

Deadline in Athens, by Petros Markaris, is a novel that feels almost like a time capsule or microcosm of Athens, Greece. Having lived and studied in Athens during my undergraduate years, I was as interested in the setting and backdrop of this novel as I was in the plot. Deadline in AthensThe writing evokes sights and sounds, as well as the general social and political feelings of the bustling Greek city. The main character is police inspector Costas Haritos, a gruff cop with problems pervading both his personal and professional lives. He is by no means a knight in shining armor, but a flawed man that takes some getting used to.

The novel begins with the brutal murder of an Albanian couple, which the Greek police cursorily investigate. The general sentiment in the novel is that the Albanians in Greece are a bad element of society, and that it’s no tragedy that two of them have turned up dead. When another Albanian is arrested for the murder, one character even comments that it’s a good day when three Albanians are taken off the streets of Athens. The ingrained racism is off-putting, but is also a reality that I noted during my own time in Greece.

While the policemen are congratulating themselves on closing the case, a reporter named Yanna Karayoryi breezes into the station and tells them that not only did they get it wrong, but they also missed a crucial element: a child. Karayoryi proceeds to announce this on the evening news, much to the chagrin of the police. Haritos is furious that the reporter is either lying or not sharing all she knows, but before he can press her for more information, Karayoryi is also murdered.

Haritos must investigate Karayoryi’s murder as well as continuing to try to run down the truth of the alleged missing child. The closer Haritos looks, the more potential motives and murderers he uncovers for each victim.  Connections are made and then broken within pages. The investigation is murky and tangled, with many red herrings and unexpected twists. The story lagged a bit in parts, though sometimes small details that emerged in seemingly unimportant passages would then become important clues later on. I got a few things right, but the big reveal was not what I was expecting at all.

A really singular aspect of this novel is the competition and animosity between the police and the news media. The reporters consider it a victory if they can scoop the police and flaunt it on television, while the police are constantly trying to keep the reporters at arm’s length from the investigation. Cooperation is minimal and grudging. In the United States, we’ve become highly used to crime as entertainment, whether fictional (a la CSI and Law and Order) or real (on the news, as well as shows like Nancy Grace). In Deadline in Athens — get the pun, by the way? — the investigations aren’t just about ratings; they’re about establishing a new order in a nation that is still finding its modern identity.

I don’t know that this book would have wide appeal for the general American audience, simply because it is so rooted in the culture of practices of Greece. Familiarity with Greece — especially Athens — was really the main thing that kept me tied to this book when the mystery aspect wasn’t engaging me. It’s an interesting read, an unusual and unique mystery, but it’s not what I would consider a thriller. The suspense is there in parts, but it wasn’t hard to put down the way some mysteries are. I enjoyed it, but it also took me considerably longer than I expected to finish it. It’s a dark, gritty novel, with many noir aspects. It’s a worthwhile read, but not necessarily a fun one.

Happy Reading!

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Review: A Dog’s Purpose

A Dog's PurposeNo two ways about it; A Dog’s Pupose is a must for dog owners. W. Bruce Cameron’s novel is heartwarming, insightful, and poignant, especially if you love dogs. The novel follows one dog — who narrates the novel — as he is born and reborn (reincarnated) over the years. Each life is enormously different from the previous one, and leads the dog to begin questioning what his purpose is in life. As he looks for his own meaning, the dog also explores human nature, family, and the relationships that shape us.

The novel opens with the dog being born as a stray mutt, scrounging for food in garbage cans and shying away from humans. He is eventually scooped up and taken in by a woman who collects stray dogs without a second thought, opening her home to an enormous pack. She names the narrator Toby, and he has a generally happy, but all-too-brief life in her home. His first death is horribly depressing, and reaffirmed my belief in adopting from shelters and/or the pound whenever possible.

The narrator is soon conscious that he has been reborn as a golden retriever, in what most readers should recognize as a puppy mill. It’s an inauspicious start, but after several close scrapes, the dog is rescued and taken home by a woman as a gift for her young son, Ethan. Ethan names the puppy Bailey, and the boy and dog immediately form an unbreakable bond. Much of the story is a dog’s-eye view of the daily world, with amusing interpretations of human behavior. However, Bailey also delves into darker, more complex issues, such as why the frightening boy down the street seems broken inside. In another instance, Bailey and Ethan get lost in the woods together, and must rely on each other to survive. The family loves Bailey, even when their own lives take sad and unexpected turns.

Bailey witnesses and plays his part in many events over the years, growing up alongside Ethan. The pair have over a decade of adventures and mishaps before Bailey grows old and tired, and eventually the family must make the hard decision to put him down. Anyone who has ever had to put a beloved pet to sleep will absolutely empathize with that scene; I had to stop reading for a few minutes to cry and hug my dog. This second death, while sad, is easier in some ways than the first, though, since at least in this life Bailey had a good long life full of love and happiness.

In his third incarnation, the dog is startled to realize that he is a female German Shepherd. As a puppy, the dog — soon named Ellie — is adopted by a police officer and is soon trained for the K-9 unit.  Ellie is an elite search-and-rescue dog, and has a strong working partnership with her handler Jakob. Jakob likes and is proud of Ellie, but does not love her the way Ethan did. Ellie’s life as a police dog is difficult, but also rewarding in its own way. Over the course of her life, Ellie faces danger, different handlers, natural disasters, and injuries. She also has a loving home for many years, and is proud of the work that she does to help people. Ellie once again lives a long and fulfilling life before she is taken to the veterinarian for the final time.

The dog is honestly surprised to find himself a puppy for the fourth time, this time as a black Labrador. His puppyhood is not happy, and I was fairly stressed for several chapters. The dog is determined to find his purpose this time around, and fate lends a hand when he is abandoned in an area that it turns out he recognizes. Without going into any spoilers, the dog (eventually named Buddy, the same as my dog!) finds himself determined not just to improve his own life, but to fully change the lives of the humans around him as well. Buddy is a miracle dog, with each life building on the ones before it. The memories from one incarnation often come back to serve him in the subsequent life. He is intelligent, loyal, and loving, with an endless capacity for optimism and courage. He is everything we hold up as to why canines are man’s best friend.

My dog, Buddy (adopted from the pound in Dec. 2010)

My dog, Buddy (adopted from the pound in Dec. 2010)

Cameron’s novel is well-written, exciting, and a pleasure to read. The action traverses the ranges from the everyday humdrum to the nail-biting extremes. It’s impossible not to love the dog narrating the novel, and my affection for the fictional dog only made my all-abiding love of my own dog all the stronger. I started wondering what my Buddy is thinking, why he reacts the way he does in any given situation, and even how he views my daily habits.

BuddyI highly encourage people to read this novel, especially dog owners. I think that A Dog’s Purpose is easily accessible to all readers, but the depth of meaning and understanding will be much greater for dog people, as will be the emotional impact of the stories. We have very special relationships with our dogs, and the novel reflects that. It both offers a potential insight into the thought processes of a dog, as well as encourages humans to be better, more respectful companions to their canines. The ending, while bittersweet, encapsulates everything that a dog owner already knows deep down: the purpose dogs play in our lives, and our purpose in theirs.

Much love, and Happy Reading!

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Review: Room

Room ruined my entire day. I feel like I’m probably in the minority with the revulsion I felt for Emma Donoghue’s novel, but I just couldn’t get into it. It’s another novel in which the horrific things that occur made my stomach twist, and gave me nightmarish mental images that I couldn’t shake. Room

Room is told from the perspective of five-year-old Jack, who we quickly learn is being held in captivity along with his mother in a single room. Jack accepts his strange environment as the norm, since he’s never known anything else, but his mother recognizes it as her prison for nearly a decade at the time the narrative starts. Jack serving as the narrator worked to underscore the peculiarity of their situation, as his innocence stands in sharp contrast to what the reader understands the reality of the kidnapped mother and her son, born of repeated rape.

However, Jack serving as the narrator was also a major irritant for me. His language is, obviously, that of a small child. I was put off by the combination of poor grammar and syntax almost as much as by the plot. Also, I found myself skeptical of the things that Jack did or didn’t know and understand. Jack will know an advanced word or concept, and then a few pages later won’t know a basic word or idea. I admit I’m a stickler for continuity, and I felt there were contradictions here. Enough on style, however; let’s move on to substance.

(Spoilers to follow!!!)

Now, the first half or so of the novel takes place in Room, but Jack and his mother eventually make their escape. I was hopeful that things would improve once they were out of captivity, but there was still a lot of pain and negativity. Their hospitalization and attempts to reacclimate to society are heart-wrenching. It’s to be expected that a kidnapping victim held for many years would struggle upon their return, but it was hard to read nonetheless. The immensity of the issues Jack and his mother face is boggling, and the mixed reaction — even from family and friends — to their return makes the process even more turbulent. There is some optimism, but not much. This is a rough read, especially in light of current events (specifically, the eerie similarities between aspects of this novel and the imprisonment and rape of the three women in Cleveland).

I don’t have much else to say about this novel, except that its ending is pretty anticlimatic. It neither goes as far nor as deep as I was hoping. This novel is a quick read, but a deeply troubling one. Should you decide to take it on, have something to cheer you up on standby. You’ll need it.

Happy Reading!

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